Sunday, 31 May 2015

New music: Pap Tee - It's My Time

Pap Tee has a degree in Computer Systems Engineering - RSUST, PGD Information Technology - Robert Gordon University, Computer architect, Software Developer, System Analyst, Business Analyst, Music Producer, Song Writer and Artist.  He was once a lecturer in the university taking 4th and Final year students on Computer Architecture and Software Engineering.

http://www.paptee.com (Link to song)

Pap Tee is versatile artistes who has grown to both love and contribute to the growth of Christian music and also donating to the lunch of several albums including Salvation Ministries -Glorified, Afy Doulas -ADORE, Tobins - Beyond Imagination, and the recent Sufficient Grace by Leke Adesioye (LA ORCHESTRA).

His music is out of the box or regulars thus spanning every genre of music. Basically, he makes music for himself and for people to enjoy.

Meet Jesus when in secondary school JSS 3 through a program organized by Living Word Bible Church (LWBC) PH where Pastor Ayo Oritsejafor ministered far back 1988. Joined the church choir and was taught rhythm guitar and later the piano by the choirmaster Mr. Amasi. Had his first major stage experience at NTA Port Harcourt where he played the piano for the LWBC choir while in his SSS3 (Secondary school).

He had never seen music as a first choice but a product of being available in the house of God; before music, Pap Tee had been on national TV (NTA) representing his state and coming “bracket” first in the once popular JETS (Junior Engineers Technicians & Scientist) Competition obtaining the price money from the Central Bank as a teenager. 

He once served as the Music Director for NYSC Christian fellowship (NCCF) in Kano Nigeria.  Once a music director in Christ the Rock Foundation of Rev Akin Oke in his 3rd year in University and a keyboardist in Chapel of Destiny of Bishop Victor Uzozike in his final year in Uni.
He is a member of Lifeway Christian Center where he had served under various capacities such as a keyboardist, Music Director and Pastor in-charge of the technical crew under his spiritual father Bishop J. Goody-Ogwama.

He is also a member of Salvation Ministries Port Harcourt, which he attends more regularly in Port Harcourt Nigeria where he sits under the tutelage of Pastor David Ibiyeomie who teaches the Word of God in simplicity and with the demonstration of the resurrection power. He is currently based in Lagos where he attends the Redeemed Christian Church of God (RCCG).

Michael Tasker is also the President of EveryOneCounts an NGO and outreach to people aimed at enhancing and fostering the rights and dignity of every human being on earth with a touch of love.

About the song 
"As long as you are still breathing no matter how old, God will fulfill your destiny
…When your time comes destiny will locate you!”
   Daddy/GO Adeboye (May 2015)

Failure is never final in life; people might have termed you a serial failure! Statistics remind us that everyone—yes that means you—will experience failure in their lives. It’s a fact (not faith)!
We all want to be part of the winning team. Right?
Gen. Buhari failed four times - this spanned so many years but with faith, determination and right attitude before our very EYE's he eventually made it!!!
IT'S YOUR TIME - to shine, to reign in life, to reach that target!





John Fashanu's daughter speaks on his divorce drama, shares pics of his injuries

Football legend John Fashanu's daughter, Amal Fashanu, has gotten involved in the divorce drama between her dad and his estranged wife, Abigail Igwe. Defending her dad and slamming Abigail ahead of their divorce hearing tomorrow June 1st, Amal called her step-mum a 'black widow' who had her dad under her spell and physically abused him.

In an interview with UK Mirror, Amal said her father suffered many domestic abuses from Abigail
“She has been dubbed the black widow back home in Nigeria and it is spot on. He was enchanted. While they were together I went from seeing my dad once a month to once a year. He vanished from his children’s lives. When I called to find out how he was and asked him to fly to London to see me, he would just say he couldn’t talk. I could sense Abigail was in the background, controlling him. He has always had that tough-guy image but it was as though she brainwashed him. I know he suffered domestic abuse.
Dad told me she attacked him more than six times, even though he only reported it three times to the police. One attack was with a sword. Another was with a glass. He also told me she’d fritter away £2,500 ‘play money’ he gave her, then ask for more. He was stupid and senseless but he feels huge regret now and is finally happy and free of her.”
Amal (above) who says her father has never stayed long with a woman, blamed his actions on his parents getting divorced when he was much younger.

She alco spoke on the first time she met Abigail after her dad married her
"As soon as Dad walked through the door with her I knew something was wrong. He had this big lump under his left eye. It looked bruised, like he had been struck, and there was a scar I could clearly make out. I knew I couldn’t ask him about it with her in the room. He seemed on edge. Abigail seemed very reserved and kept me at arm’s length. I couldn’t see what Dad saw in her. She claims she is 48 but Dad told me she is actually several years older than him. He has stunning women of my age throwing themselves at him, yet he went for her. It was only after I heard they were splitting that he told me the truth about his eye. He said she came at him from behind with a glass and cut him after becoming increasingly jealous. He told me, ‘She was convinced I had been having an affair. All she can think is that I am sleeping with another woman – and it is not true. He would never raise a hand to her though. He is too respectful of women to ever harm them.”

Amal claims her father never cheated on Abigail
"I haven’t asked my dad about those ­rumours, because I honestly don’t want to know. I am traditional and a Catholic. Abigail was obviously good fun in the bedroom, because I can’t think what else she had going for her. But I also know that footballers do those things. He also doesn’t need to sleep with his maid, as Abigail has claimed. He could sleep with anyone, so what on earth would he do that for? It simply isn’t true. He has said Abigail was always around women, though. She has asked him to retract comments that she is a lesbian because she wants to be a pastor.”
The divorce case between Abigail Igwe and John Fashanu comes up tomorrow Monday June 1st. Abigail is allegedly asking for 50,000 million pounds divorce settlement.



John Fashanu's daughter speaks on his divorce drama, shares pics of his injuries

Football legend John Fashanu's daughter, Amal Fashanu, has gotten involved in the divorce drama between her dad and his estranged wife, Abigail Igwe. Defending her dad and slamming Abigail ahead of their divorce hearing tomorrow June 1st, Amal called her step-mum a 'black widow' who had her dad under her spell and physically abused him.

In an interview with UK Mirror, Amal said her father suffered many domestic abuses from Abigail
“She has been dubbed the black widow back home in Nigeria and it is spot on. He was enchanted. While they were together I went from seeing my dad once a month to once a year. He vanished from his children’s lives. When I called to find out how he was and asked him to fly to London to see me, he would just say he couldn’t talk. I could sense Abigail was in the background, controlling him. He has always had that tough-guy image but it was as though she brainwashed him. I know he suffered domestic abuse.
Dad told me she attacked him more than six times, even though he only reported it three times to the police. One attack was with a sword. Another was with a glass. He also told me she’d fritter away £2,500 ‘play money’ he gave her, then ask for more. He was stupid and senseless but he feels huge regret now and is finally happy and free of her.”
Amal (above) who says her father has never stayed long with a woman, blamed his actions on his parents getting divorced when he was much younger.

She alco spoke on the first time she met Abigail after her dad married her
"As soon as Dad walked through the door with her I knew something was wrong. He had this big lump under his left eye. It looked bruised, like he had been struck, and there was a scar I could clearly make out. I knew I couldn’t ask him about it with her in the room. He seemed on edge. Abigail seemed very reserved and kept me at arm’s length. I couldn’t see what Dad saw in her. She claims she is 48 but Dad told me she is actually several years older than him. He has stunning women of my age throwing themselves at him, yet he went for her. It was only after I heard they were splitting that he told me the truth about his eye. He said she came at him from behind with a glass and cut him after becoming increasingly jealous. He told me, ‘She was convinced I had been having an affair. All she can think is that I am sleeping with another woman – and it is not true. He would never raise a hand to her though. He is too respectful of women to ever harm them.”

Amal claims her father never cheated on Abigail
"I haven’t asked my dad about those ­rumours, because I honestly don’t want to know. I am traditional and a Catholic. Abigail was obviously good fun in the bedroom, because I can’t think what else she had going for her. But I also know that footballers do those things. He also doesn’t need to sleep with his maid, as Abigail has claimed. He could sleep with anyone, so what on earth would he do that for? It simply isn’t true. He has said Abigail was always around women, though. She has asked him to retract comments that she is a lesbian because she wants to be a pastor.”
The divorce case between Abigail Igwe and John Fashanu comes up tomorrow Monday June 1st. Abigail is allegedly asking for 50,000 million pounds divorce settlement.



Buhari's Inauguration & the restoration of electricity supply: APC's change or civil servants eye-service? - PDP Watchdog

Press statement from PDP Media Watchdog. Read below..
The PDP Media Watchdog has queried the events in the last few days prior to the inauguration on Friday May 29th 2015 of President Muhammadu Buhari and Vice President Yemi Osibanjo. A situation were there was a total power outage and the whole country was shutdown for more than a week and the sudden restoration of electricity supply on the night of Democracy Day during the swearing of the APC's administration.

"Nigerians will recall the total blackout in the country in the last few weeks owing to shortage in power supply as a result of the vandalization of gas pipeline that powers the turbines and the gof major dam facilities in various part of Nigeria. However, after the prolonged wait by our people, suddenly, there was restoration of energy immediately President Buhari was inaugurated. Is this part of the APC's Change? Or an action taken by Civil Servants to impress the new government of APC of their total loyalty?"

The group reminded Nigerians of their earlier warning of the choice of APC to govern the country due to all the false propaganda by the Party before the elections and the die hard attitude of the All Progressive Congress not to see anything good in the administration of the PDP under President Goodluck Jonathan saying, "This same APC and their propaganda abused and condemned the Agricultural Policy of President Jonathan but chooses to make Goodluck's Agric Minister as the President of African Development Bank (ADB). We cannot also forget in a hurry of the noise by the APC and how they mobilized Nigerians against President Goodluck Jonathan on the total removal of fuel subsidy but now turned around 360 degree to campaign for the removal of the subsidy, we hope Nigerians have not entered into what is popularly called in our local parlance 'one chance'" the group said

The statement reads in parts, "While the PDP's administration since 1999 toiled hard to revamped Nigeria's economy and built several infrastructure for the people of this country, the opposition parties that has today metamorphosed into the present All Progressive Congress (APC) have been sabotaging the nation at every level in order to score cheap political capital. 

President Muhammadu Buhari and his party the All Progressive Congress, APC have deceived Nigerians to vote for change but instead rides on the back of PDP's policies and programs which remains the only solution to solve Nigeria's challenges.

A party that will decide to sabotage, blackmail, destroy the economy and make her people suffer to score political points should not be encouraged and Nigerians should prepare to challenge the APC on all their promises and programs during the campaigns and no amount of excuse will stop the people from holding them to deliver on these promises"

Tunde Lawal
For: PDP Media Watchdog




Queen of Aso Nigeria 2015 kicks off audition in Lagos

Queen of Aso, which started in 2005 will be having its 10th year Anniversary this year. There will be a preliminary show in Lagos for the first time in the history of the Pageant before the Grand finale in Abuja. This is your Opportunity to represent Nigeria at the Miss Africa Pageant in South Africa. Win a Brand New Car, Get a Modelling Contract and be an ambassador of culture and tourism in Nigeria.


To Register-Pay 5,000 into Any Access Bank Nationwide...Aso Multi Media Ventures-Account No-0052483053 fill and summit ur form @ www.queenofaso.org...........

LAGOS AUDITiON on 6th June @ Club Vegas, Ikeja,Lagos State.
OWERRI AUDITION on Friday 19th June @ City Cheff,Opposite Rock View Hotel,Owerri,Imo State.
PORT HARCOURT AUDITION on Saturday 19th June@ Leesuka Event Center,Trans Amadi layout,PHC.
BENIN CITY AUDITION on Saturday 20th June@ Royal Marble Hotel.
CALABAR AUDITION on Saturday 4th July 2015 @ Halite Entertainment Center,Calabar,Cross Rivers State.
ABUJA AUDITION on Saturday 11th July @ THE BANK,No-80 Adetokunbo Ademola Crescent,Wuse 2,Abuja....

Audition Time-10am prompt.
For more info call-08069552027,08036798508 or Ping-2bb66453
 www.queenofaso.org





Chimamanda writes about her father's kidnapping in the New York Times

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie on her father's kidnapping 'If you don’t give us what we want,you will never see his dead body,”the voice said. What she wrote on New York Times Opinion below...
My father was kidnapped in Nigeria on a Saturday morning in early May. My brother called to tell me, and suddenly there was not enough breathable air in the world. My father is 83 years old. A small, calm, contented man, with a quietly mischievous humor and a luminous faith in God, his beautiful dark skin unlined, his hair in sparse silvery tufts, his life shaped by that stoic, dignified responsibility of being an Igbo first son.

He got his doctoral degree at Berkeley in the 1960s, on a scholarship from the United States Agency for International Development; became Nigeria’s first professor of statistics; raised six children and many relatives; and taught at the University of Nigeria for 50 years. Now he makes fun of himself, at how slowly he climbs the stairs, how he forgets his cellphone. He talks often of his childhood, endearing and rambling stories, his words tender with wisdom.

Sometimes I record his Igbo proverbs, his turns of phrase. A disciplined diabetic, he takes daily walks and is to be found, after each meal, meticulously recording his carbohydrate grams in a notebook. He spends hours bent over Sudoku. He swallows a handful of pills everyday. His is a generation at dusk.
On the morning he was kidnapped, he had a bag of okpa, apples and bottled water that my mother had packed for him. He was in the back seat of his car, his driver at the wheel, on a lonely stretch between Nsukka, the university town where he lives, and Abba, our ancestral hometown. He was going to attend a traditional meeting of men from his age group. A two-hour drive. My mother was planning their late lunch upon his return: pounded yam and a fresh soup. They always called each other when either traveled alone. This time, he didn’t call. She called him and his phone was switched off. They never switched off their phones. Hour after hour, she called and it remained off. Later, her phone rang, and although it was my father’s number calling, a stranger said, “We have your husband.”

Kidnappings are not uncommon in southeastern Nigeria and, unlike similar incidents in the Niger Delta, where foreigners are targeted, here it is wealthy or prominent local residents. Still, the number of abductions has declined in the past few years, which perhaps is why my reaction, in the aftermath of my shock, was surprise.

My close-knit family banded together more tightly and held vigil by our phones. The kidnappers said they would call back, but they did not. We waited. The desire to urge time forward numbed and ate my soul. My mother took her phone with her everywhere, and she heard it ringing when it wasn’t. The waiting was unbearable. I imagined my father in a diabetic coma. I imagined his octogenarian heart collapsing.

“How can they do this violence to a man who would not kill an ant?” my mother lamented. My sister said, “Daddy will be fine because he is a righteous man.” Ordinarily, I would never use “righteous” in a non-pejorative way. But something shifted in my perception of language. The veneer of irony fell away. It felt true. Later, I repeated it to myself. My father would be fine because he was a “righteous man.”
I understood then the hush that surrounds kidnappings in Nigeria, why families often said little even after it was over. We felt paranoid. We did not know if going public would jeopardize my father’s life, if the neighbors were complicit, if another member of the family might be kidnapped as well.
“Is my husband alive?” my mother asked, when the kidnappers finally called back, and her voice broke. “Shut up!” the male voice said. My mother called him “my son.” Sometimes, she said “sir.” Anything not to antagonize him while she begged and pleaded, about my father being ill, about the ransom being too high. How do you bargain for the life of your husband? How do you speak of your life partner in the deadened tone of a business transaction?

“If you don’t give us what we want, you will never see his dead body,” the voice said.

My paternal grandfather died in a refugee camp during the Nigeria-Biafra war and his anonymous death, his unknown grave, has haunted my father’s life. Those words — You will never see his dead body”shook us all.

Kidnapping’s ugly psychological melodrama works because it trades on the most precious of human emotions: love. They put my father on the phone, and his voice was a low shadow of itself. “Give them what they want,” he said. “I will not survive if I stay here longer.” My stoic father. It had been three days but it felt like weeks.

Friends called to ask for bank-account details so they could donate toward the ransom. It felt surreal. Did it ever feel real to anybody in such a situation, I wondered? The scramble to raise the money in one day. The menacingly heavy bag of cash. My brother dropping it off, through a circuitous route, in a wooded area.

Late that night, my father was taken to a clearing and set free.

While his blood sugar and pressure were checked, my father kept reassuring us that he was fine, thanking us over and over for doing all we could. This is what he knows how to be — the protector, the father — and he slipped into his role almost as a defense. But there were cracks in his spirit. A drag in his gait. A bruise on his back.

“They asked me to climb into the boot of their car,” he said. “I was going to do so, but one of them picked me up and threw me inside. Threw. The boot was full of things and I hit my head on something. They drove fast. The road was very bumpy.”
I imagined this grace-filled man crumpled inside the rear of a rusty car. My rage overwhelmed my relief — that he suffered such an indignity to his body and mind.
And yet he engaged them in conversation. “I tried to reach their human side,” he said. “I told them I was worried about my wife.”

The next day, my parents were on a flight to the United States, away from the tainted blur that Nigeria had become.

With my father’s release, we all cried, as though it was over. But one thing had ended and another begun. I constantly straddled panic; I was sleepless, unfocused, jumpy, fearful that something else had gone wrong. And there was my own sad guilt: He was targeted because of me. “Ask your daughter the writer to bring the money,” the kidnappers told him, because to appear in newspapers in Nigeria, to be known, is to be assumed wealthy. The image of my father shut away in the rough darkness of a car boot haunted me. Who had done this? I needed to know.

But ours was a dance of disappointment with the authorities. We had reported the kidnapping immediately, and the first shock soon followed: State security officials asked us to pay for anti-kidnap tracking equipment, a large amount, enough to rent a two-bedroom flat in Lagos for a year. This, despite my being privileged enough to get personal reassurances from officials at the highest levels.
How, I wondered, did other families in similar situations cope? Federal authorities told us they needed authorization from the capital, Abuja, which was our responsibility to get. We made endless phone calls, helpless and frustrated. It was as though with my father’s ransomed release, the crime itself had disappeared. To encounter that underbelly, to discover the hollowness beneath government proclamations of security, was jarring.

Now my father smiles and jokes, even of the kidnapping. But he jerks awake from his naps at the sound of a blender or a lawn mower, his eyes darting about. He recounts, in the middle of a meal, apropos of nothing, a detail about the mosquito-filled room where he was kept or the rough feel of the blindfold around his eyes. My greatest sadness is that he will never forget.




Pics: Kylie Jenner & Tyga only have eyes for each other at basketball game

The 17 year old reality star and her 25 year old rapper boyfriend only had eyes for each other despite being surrounded by plenty people at a celebrity Basketball game in LA last night. More pics after the cut...







'I owe you a debt of gratitude' - Buruji Kashamu writes to the media, judiciary

Press statement from embattled senator-elect, Buruji Kashamu. Read below...
On behalf of myself, family, associates and well-wishers, I wish to express my profound gratitude to the almighty Allah, the media, the judiciary, civil society organisations, students, professional groups and other public-spirited Nigerians home and abroad, who stood by me during the six-day siege laid to my Lagos residence by operatives of the National Drug Law Enforcement Agency (NDLEA).
I apologize to my neighbours in Lekki Phase 1, especially the management, members of staff and pupils of The Lagoon School, for all the pains and inconveniences you were subjected to. I know that you could not open the school throughout last week because of the barricade mounted by the fully armed and stern-looking NDLEA operatives. As an entrepreneur and a parent, I know the quantum of the loss you and your children have suffered as a result of the siege.

For the six days, I was denied access to my doctors despite having challenges with my blood and sugar levels. They rose astronomically, yet they would not budge.

So quite naturally, after those who illegally invaded my house left on Thursday night, I was rushed to a private hospital where I am presently receiving treatment.

Although, I plan to address the media, Nigerians and the whole world on my present travails and the intricate web of politics and manoeuvrings that led to it soon, I cannot wait to say thank you to all those who stood my me through the six dark days and nights.

I have been traumatized and unjustly victimized but your fervent prayers, solidarity and support kept me. I thank you for standing by me. May the almighty Allah Subhana wa tala, who has been my refuge and stay, stand by you all.

On this note, I wish to particularly thank http://ift.tt/1gQlKHX, Channels Television, African Independent Television (AIT), Nigeria Television Authority (NTA), Silverbird Television, Core TV, Wazobia FM, Inspiration FM, Classic FM, Rhythm FM, Cool FM, ThisDay, Vanguard, Daily Sun, The Punch, The Nation, Leadership, The Guardian, Tribune, Daily Independent, Daily Times, Sahara Reporters, British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) and other traditional and social media organisations – too numerous to mention – for proving yet to be the voice of the voiceless.

I am really grateful to the media and the judiciary and would forever live to cherish these institutions and their personnel. Words would fail me in showing my appreciation to you, but know that I owe you a debt of gratitude that I may never be able to repay.
Once again, thank you all!

Signed
Prince Buruji Kashamu
Senator-elect, Ogun East Senatorial District



Buhari can stop class war between the rich and the poor – Ben Murray Bruce

Bayelsa state senator-elect Mr. Ben Murray Bruce spoke on issues relating to accountability and transparency in government.
He said:
I have not criticised any government. I have not criticised APC. I have not criticised PDP. I have not criticised Goodluck Jonathan, neither have I criticised Muhammadu Buhari. I have raised good government issues and policy issues. 
These are issues that I have raised all my life.  Maybe these people on social media have just discovered Ben Bruce but, go and check the speeches I made two years ago, three years ago, twenty years ago, even in front of President Goodluck Jonathan to ascertain whether they are different from what I am saying now; maybe they just discovered me. Go on youtube and see my speeches.
The level of poverty and unemployment is devastating. We need to focus on laws that protect the poor. What is the biggest problem in Nigeria today? It is consumption versus production. Our leaders are guilty of consuming the resources of the majority. What do we have for the poor – the millions of people living on two dollars a day? And then you have governors in large convoys, commissioners driving N20m cars, flying first class in states that cannot pay salaries. The governors fly private jets. Commissioners live like kings. If three policemen guard a commissioner, how many policemen do we have in Nigeria? Less than 200,000. So who is policing the poor when they are being raped, maimed and killed, their goods stolen?
In Bayelsa, sea pirates steal from boats. They steal N200, N500, fishing nets; they attack people and rape their women. There is poverty and frustration everywhere in the land. And then people we voted into offices are living like lords. Does that make sense? Is it legal? Is it ethical? Is it moral? Can you justify that consumption behaviour because they voted you into office? In most states, the only employer of labour is government, the rest are jobless.
Some government officials will wake up one morning like monarchs and dash money to the people on the street because they see them as beggars. You turn your people to beggars and you get scared that they could kill you. Why won’t you live in fear? What if you consume less and distribute what you have to the rest of the people so that they can be happy and you can live in peace?
It is a class war between the rich and the poor. I have said it for 35 years and I am saying it again because it is worse today.  Boko Haram in the North, militancy in the South-South, kidnapping in the South-West and South East; raping, paedophile, maiming and stealing everywhere, what does that tell you? We have a problem in our hands and everybody must be held accountable.
President Buhari, who I like, is leading by example. He is a simple man and, because he is a simple man, I expect him to appoint people who will live simple lifestyle, people that will not consume the resources of the people. As lawmakers, we will checkmate their lifestyle. I will remind every minister and appointee of the need to live moderate life.
I am fighting against the corrupt elite. I am 59 and you only live once. The worst they can do to me is to take me out, so what? When the corrupt elite see me, let them know I am fighting them. When they drink that bottle of champagne that can educate a child, let them know I am fighting them. When they fly first class with tax payers money, let them know I am fighting them. Let them know that I am totally against their lifestyle because it is destroying the economy. We are broke, the elite deserve to be fought and they should be ashamed of themselves going by the way they live.
You go into government and fly first class but in your private life, you fly economy. You go into government, one man carries your phone, another opens the door of your car, another carries your bag, another reads the newspapers to you and you have ten policemen protecting you, what for? Were you born to the world as a king and everyone of us must worship you? They should apologise to Nigerians for looting the treasury and destroying the economy.
We don’t have distribution of wealth in Nigeria but the apportioning of wealth by the small minority and nothing else for the poor majority. There is no wealth distribution and that is why we don’t have the middle class. There are the poor and the champagne drinking super rich.




Nigerians will appreciate Jonathan in future - Nyesom Wike

Read the press statement below...
Rivers State Governor, Nyesom Ezenwo Wike has declared that Nigerians will in the future appreciate the contributions of immediate past President Goodluck Jonathan to national development. In an interview with journalists after the Thanksgiving Service for Former President Goodluck Jonathan at Yenagoa on Saturday, Nyesom Wike said that Jonathan has worked hard to improve the standard of living in the country.
He described Jonathan as a worthy Nigerian leader who has contributed to deepening the country’s democracy.

Wike said: "Nigerians will in the near future appreciate all the contributions of President Goodluck Jonathan to the development of the country in all spheres of life. "His greatest achievement is his work in democratic circles. Nigeria will forever be grateful to him for being a statesman".

The governor noted that the high-powered delegation from Rivers State to the former President was indicative of the appreciation of the state.

Governor Wike was accompanied to Bayelsa by his deputy, Dr Mrs. Ipalibo Harry Banigo, Former Governor, Celestine Omehia, former deputy governor, Tele Ikuru, former Deputy Speaker, Rt. Hon Austin Opara, Senators elect, House of Representatives elect and elected members of the House of Assembly.



'I am not Yusuf Buhari' - young man whose pics has gone viral cries out



Two days ago, the photo above went viral on Nigerian social media. It was supposedly a photo of the son of Nigeria's new president, Mohammadu Buhari, Yusuf Buhari with his girlfriend. They may have striking resemblance but that is not Yusuf. The real person wrote in to LIB. Read below...
"My name is Muhammad Kabir Hadejia and I need your help. There's a picture of myself and my sister that has gone viral on the internet with people claiming it is Yusuf Buhari, the son of the president. I see news pages on Facebook and twitter spreading the false news. I strongly deny it and would like you to help me spread the news that that picture is me and Yusuf buhari. I take this issue very dangerous to my safety and hopefully you will help me. Attached are my pictures so you can compare to confirm I'm real
Below is the real Yusuf Buhari...